Category Archives: Birds

the Western Gull (WEGU)

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WEGUs in March – here they are confiding, easy to admire, and “much that is good…”

The Western Gull (Larus occidentalis) is the”typical” large, white-headed gull of the west coast of the US. Seen at most beaches, but rarely inland (except at the Salton Sea), this is more of an obligate “sea” gull than other gulls. They breed on offshore islands during the summer, and the Farallones constitute an important breeding location for them. They are the most obvious island resident due to their numbers and their character. Here, a brilliant quote from one of California’s earliest naturalists – William Leon Dawson.

Much that is good and all that is evil has gathered itself up into the Western Gull. He is rather the handsomest of the blue-mantled Laridae, for the depth of color in the mantle, in sharp contrast with the snowy plumage of back and breast, gives him an appearance of sturdiness and quality which is not easily dispelled by subsequent knowledge of the black heart within. As a scavanger, the Western Gull is impeccable. Wielding the besom of hunger, he and his kind sweep the beaches clean and purge the water-front of all pollution. But a scavanger is not necessarily a good citizen. Call him a ghoul, rather, for the Western Gull is cruel of beak and bottomless of maw. Pity, with him, is a thing unknown; and when one of their own comrades dies, these feathered jackals fall upon him without compunction, a veritable Leichnamveranderungsgebrauchsgesellschaft. If he thus mistreats his own kind, be assured that this gull asks only two questions of any other living thing: First, ‘Am I hungry?’ (Ans., ‘Yes,’) Second, ‘Can I get away with it?’ (Ans., ‘I’ll try.’)

[…]Nothing in the life of the Farallons [sic] is more striking than the rapacity of the gulls and their determination to profit by any excitement which will frighten the peasantry.

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Brandt’s Cormorant Diet Studies

—– Written for (and cross-posted from) the excellent Point Blue Conservation Science Blog – Los Farallones —–

My internship at the Farallones involved many different fascinating studies, but one of my favorite studies were the seabird diets, as they really tie in the oceanographic aspect of marine ornithology. We are lucky to be able to live on this incredible, rugged island surrounded by the Pacific ocean and work with the birds that call it home, but sometimes it can be easy to take for granted just how strong the connection is that these birds have to the marine environment. By incorporating the feeding ecology of the seabirds, we are also considering vast topics like oceanic health, fisheries ecology, and climate change, much of which is still poorly understood. Taking part in studies that delve into this mysterious, watery realm is pretty exciting. Brandt’s cormorants also happen to be one of my favorite birds on the island – how could you not love the silky black birds that look like Muppets with long necks and giant feet, and whose eyes are a vibrant, deep turquoise?

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Male Brandt’s Cormorant in full display glory

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Crested Auklets

One of the most charismatic, yet underappreciated birds on the planet has got to be the Crested Auklet (Aethia cristatella). Crested auklets are ridiculously goofy-looking birds during their summer breeding season.

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Most species of seabirds are pretty unassuming in appearance, with a standard palette of blacks, greys, white, and browns, and the sexes are frequently similar. -Part of the reason for this contrast with much showier avian groups like parrots and songbirds is because of the parental investment that seabirds engage in. Most species are long-lived and only raise one or two chicks a year. In Crested Auklets, both parents engage in parental care, often sharing incubation and feeding duties – although at least one study showed that CRAU males tended to brood and defend chicks more often, while females tended to forage and bring food back for the chicks more often. This serial monogamy means that there is no pay-off for the male bird to copulate with as many females as possible, as they all already have a mate, a brood, and it takes a lot of work to care for and raise the single chick.

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Buldir Island – Remote Field Camp Preparation

So, I will start from the beginning, going a little bit in depth in terms of the gear that I brought with me.

I love gear lists because not only do I find other peoples’ lists interesting, considering their own thought processes during prep, but incredibly useful in terms of considering what I might like/need to bring.

After applying, being interviewed, and finding out I was chosen to go on the expedition, I had a month and a half to get everything ready and in order.  I put a lot of thought into packing. It was really important to bring the right stuff because out there, there would be no supplementing gear if I needed more. I would only have what I brought with me, for two whole months in harsh conditions, and so I knew I would be better off (over) prepared.

Never having been to the Aleutians, and living in southern California, it was difficult to envision the precise gear I would need. I knew, however, that the short summer season climate there is consistently rainy, windy, cold, humid, and overcast, with temperatures ranging down into at least the 30s at night. I knew I would have to bring plenty of warm and waterproof clothes. Luckily, I still had a lot of my gear from Antarctica in good shape – in addition to all my camping/outdoors gear. Still, there were certain things I would need to get.

Another small thing to consider was the fact that there would be only hand-washing, and that due to the precipitation levels, I would need to be able to put that off as much as possible. Luckily, I have plenty of wool layers – a property of wool is that it does not harbor the bacteria that make for bad body odor smells – a truly wonderful property that was very much appreciated on Buldir.

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GEAR LIST…

  1. Ski Jacket – outermost layer that was primarily used while observing birds from the blind, to keep warm while sitting motionless for hours.
  2. Rain Jackets x 3
    1. Patagonia Triolet – this was a new purchase, and I justified an expensive GoreTex jacket knowing that it would serve me well far beyond Buldir. These are breathable, waterproof jackets you buy for life.
    2. Old TNF rain jacket – used for field work, I got this jacket irreparably filthy while wearing it daily for field work. It got covered in guano, paint, and mud, but performed great!
    3. Marmot Precip rain jacket – back up in case the others didn’t perform or were destroyed or ripped irreparably. I didn’t actually ever need to use it, but it was wise to bring along just in case.

      soaked outer layers on the hike to Spike Camp

      soaked outer layers on the hike to Spike Camp

  3. Ski Pants x 2
    1. Marmot GoreTex pants – I found these for a great deal and thought they would come in handy on the island. They were too nice to wear during field work, but they were a good pair to have for other activities. Durable, waterproof, breathable.
    2. Roxy ski pants – never used them and really didn’t need to bring them.
  4. Waterproof Pants Shell
    1. Patagonia Rain Shadow pants – these were awesome. I ended up using these on a daily basis and they were really great. Only a few rips after days spent rubbing up and scooting down and climbing over rough granite boulders on the talus (thanks, RipStop!).
    2. Sierra Designs Microlight pants – a super thin, lightweight packable waterproof layer. I would never wear these while working (they would rip on the granite in a heartbeat), but they were useful around camp on wet days.

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Buldir Island Seabird Work

I spent the summer of 2014 working on a tiny island at the boundary of the North Pacific and the Bering Sea. This island, Buldir, is one of about 300 in the Aleutian Island chain, which arcs out from mainland Alaska approximately 1,400 miles. Buldir itself is located in the far western portion of the island chain, making it one of the furthest away from the mainland, and also almost the most-western bit of the United States (Attu holds that distinction, three islands to the west). Buldir is closer to the Kamchatka Peninsula of Russia than it is to the United States. All in all, this was one of the most remote places on the planet, and I was incredibly lucky to have scored a position there for two months, along with six other young naturalists, monitoring the breeding seabird populations on the island. It was the experience of a lifetime.

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Surrounded by the Pacific Ocean and the Bering Sea, Buldir is a true oceanic island in every sense of the word. It is home to hundreds of thousands of seabirds that come to the island to breed during the summer. In fact, Buldir is the most diverse seabird island in the world, acting as breeding grounds for 22 documented seabirds species. It is seabird heaven, the perfect place for someone like me – with my education in marine biology, experience in ornithology, and deep, abiding interest in the synthesis of the two in the form of SEABIRDS. And it was a transformative experience.
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Lake Mattamuskeet

Winter trip to see what waterfowl were around the Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge. We went on this trip much later than we have in the past – mid-January versus our usual mid-December trip.

We found information online (on the Fish & Wildlife website) that the main road would be closed until 1 pm, pretty much every winter Saturday and Sunday, for waterfowl hunts. This was news to me! So we left a little later than normally and arrived at the refuge around 12:30 pm. It was still a 3.5 hour drive from North Topsail Island – a tedious drive but worth it, and one I definitely wanted to do since we did not get to go last winter.
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Birds of 2013

Starting this list over halfway into the year is not ideal, but I’ve been keeping a running tally of new year birds written on scraps of paper and random noteboooks here and there. So this list will be updated as I find all the little lists and compile them here! I am sure to be missing a few species here and there, unfortunately, but that’s the impetus for making sure I get it right come 2014.

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